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Introduction   Lesson 1 Lesson 2 Lesson 3 Lesson 4

 

Cybersocks
2 Socks on 2 Circulars
Instructor: Sheron Goldin
Feel free to ask Sheron questions on the socknitters list or contact Sheron directly


 

Lesson Four - The Toe

Welcome to the final lesson.Your sock should look like picture 1 from the sole side and picture 2 from the instep side.Now you are ready to decrease for the toe.


Picture 1


Picture 2


Toe decreases

There are two basic ways to do the toe: the star toe and the shaped toe.Both have the same decreases but placed at different points in the work.The Star toe is discussed in the extras section at the end of the class.

A shaped toe has the decreases at the sides of the foot.It decreases 4 stitches every other row, two on the sole side and 2 on the instep side.For a better look, work the decreases one stitch in from the end of the row. If you feel that this results in a toe that is too pointy you can do the first half of the decreases every other row, then decrease every row for the rest.Or vary how much of the decreases are done every other row and how much are done every row until you find the toe that works for you and looks right to you.Remember itís your sock.Have fun with it.

If you remember we defined the middle of the heel as the beginning of the row while working the heel although we did not move any stitches around.We continue with this definition for this section also.Because the row is defined as beginning and ending at the middle of the sole each row on the sole side of the sock will have a decrease.Both decreases will be done on the same row for the instep stitches.So for this sock:

Row 1 (sole side): Knit to 3 stitches from the end, knit 2 together, knit 1 (you will have an odd number of stitches on the needle).Repeat for second sock.

Row 1 (instep side): Knit 1, SSK (slip a stitch as if to knit, slip a second stitch as if to knit, insert left hand needle into front of two slipped stitches and knit), knit to last 3 stitches, knit 2 together (you will have an even number of stitches, one less than the number on the sole stitches).Repeat for second sock.

Row 2 (sole side): Knit 1, SSK, knit across to end (you will now have an even number of stitches on the needle, the same number as for the instep side of the sock). Repeat for other sock.

Row 2 (instep side): Knit across.Repeat for other sock.
Repeat these 2 rows (row 1 sole side both for both socks, then row 1 instep side for both socks, then row 2 sole side for both socks, then row 2 instep side for both sides and start over) until 8 stitches remain ending with a row 2 sole side (yes this will leave the instep side one row shorter Ė donít worry it wonít be noticed).This leaves less chance of getting donkey ears (those pesky pointy ends you sometimes end up with).††

Some of you will have question as looking at these directions it appears that you are decreasing every round and you are used to decreasing every other round.For those who have never knit socks Ė stop thinking, donít worry about this and you donít need to read this until after you have decreased for the toes.In fact you may never need to read this if you donít want to.Donít let it confuse you.The fact that the round starts in the middle of the row is what is causing this perception.Round 1 (starting at the middle of the row of sole stitches) is actually (for each sock): Knit to 3 stitches from end, k2 tog, k1, turn, K1, SSK, k to 3 stitches from end of instep stitches, k2 tog, k1, turn, k1, SSK, k to end of round (middle of the sock).Round 2 is: knit across all stitches from beginning to end of round (again ending in the middle of the stitches on the needle).Does this help you see in your mind what is actually happening rather than what your mind says the pattern says?Hope so


Picture 3

This picture shows the decreases in progress with the stitches slanting inward on both sides of the toe.This is why on one side we do a k2 together and on the other we SSK.

Cut the yarn leaving a 12Ē tail and thread a darning needle with the tail.

 

Ending off (or the dreaded kitchener stitch A.K.A. grafting)

As you are working you are creating another row of stitches, which will join the front and back stitches.You want the weaving you are doing to look as if you knitted the stitch so donít snug it too tight or leave it too loose.You can tighten up your stitches as you go or at the end.If you want to practice and find it easier to see what you are doing Ė use a separate strand of yarn in a contrasting color.Each time you move your yarn pass it under the needle rather than over the needle.This will prevent you from thinking you have an extra stitch that has to be worked away, or having longer floats that have to be tightened up.

Prep work (which could be done as you worked the last row if you remember and feel confident enough Ė I often forget so donít worry about it just do it now):You will be working with both the instep group of stitches and the sole group of stitches.Hold both needles with the stitches at the tip of the needle, as if ready to knit after turning your work (just donít slip the just worked stitches to the cable part of the needle this time).Slip the first two stitches from the front needle as if to purl from the left hand needle to the right hand needle as in picture 4, slip the first stitch over the second stitch as in picture 5, then return the stitches to the left hand needle.Do the same with the group of stitches on the other needle.This helps to prevent ďdonkey earsĒ from forming.When you get to the last two stitches you will slip the last stitch over the next to the last stitch.


Picture 4


Picture 5

Now hold the darning needle as if it were the knitting needle you were going to work onto.Hold your knitting needles so that one is behind the other and that the yarn end you will be working with is coming from the back needle.It helps me to also have the back needle sitting slightly on top of the front needle.Put the darning needle with the yarn threaded through it through the first stitch on the front needle as if to purl.Leave the stitch on the needle.Put the darning needle through the first stitch on the back needle as if to knit and again leave the stitch on the knitting needle.
*Put the darning needle through the first stitch on the front needle as if to knit that stitch and take that stitch off the needle (drop it), put the needle through the next stitch on the front needle (now the first stitch sitting there) as if to purl the stitch.Leave that stitch on the needle.

Put the darning needle through the first stitch on the back needle as if to purl that stitch and take that stitch of the needle (drop it), put the needle through the next stitch on the back needle (now the first stitch sitting there) as if to knit the stitch.Leave that stitch on the needle.**

Repeat from * to ** across the row.†† When you have 3 stitches left on each needle work the first stitch off the needle as before from the front needle.You now have 2 stitches left on that needle so slip the last stitch over the first stitch leaving only one stitch on that needle, and work the remaining stitch as the second stitch of that group.Repeat for the back needle.Now with one stitch left on each needle work the stitch on the front needle as if to knit, remove it from the needle, work the stitch on the back needle as if to purl, remove it from the needle, make sure the stitches are snug but not too tight, pull the thread tail to the inside of the work and weave in the end.Repeat for the second sock and you are done.
 


Picture 6


Picture 7


Picture 8

  
Picture 9

Picture 6 shows the darning needle going as if to purl the first stitch on the front needle.Picture 7 shows the darning needle goingas if to knit the first stitch on the front needle.Picture 8 shows the darning needle going as if to knit the first stitch on the back needle and picture 9 shows the darning needle going as if to purl the first stitch on the back needle.


Picture 10

 


Picture 11

 

Picture 12

Pictures 10, 11 and 12 show one of the finished socks from the instep side, the side of the sock and the sole of the sock.

I hope you have enjoyed this class.

Remember, if you knit a pair of children's socks in at least 75% wool and have no child to give it to, you can send it to Karen Porter for CIC.

 

Extras for your future socks:

Alternative Heel Flap - The Eye of Partridge Stitch

Row 1(knit row): *Slip 1 stitch, knit 1 stitch. Repeat from *
Row 2 and 4 (purl rows): Slip 1 stitch, purl across to the last stitch, knit last stitch.
Row 3: Slip 2 stitches, *knit 1, slip 1 across, end with knit last 2 stitches.
Repeat these 4 rows until you have knit the number of rows needed for the heel flap. You will end with a purl row.

The slipped stitches do not fall directly above one another in this pattern.

 

Alternate Toe:

The Star Toe divides the work into sections and has a decrease at the end of each section. A simple star toe, working with four decreases in a row would be written as:

Row 1: *Knit 6 stitches, knit 2 together, knit 6 stitches, knit 2 together **, (switch yarn as you are switching socks), repeat from * to **, turn to the other needle and repeat across that needle. The remaining instructions lists only one repeat - you can add the additional repeats yourself.

Row 2 and all even rows: Knit across.

Row 3: Knit 5, knit 2 together across and around

Row 5: Knit 4, knit 2 together across and around

Row 7: Knit 3, knit 2 together across and around

Row 9: Knit 2, knit 2 together across and around

Row 11: Knit 1, knit 2 together across and around

At the end of this row each sock will have a total of 8 stitches (4 on each needle). cut the yarn leaving a 12" tail. With a darning needle thread yarn through these stitches. Go through the stitches a second time to fill in the stitches and decrease your chance of having a hole at the tip. Draw the stitches together by pulling the tail snugly. Weave the tail in on the wrong side of the sock.


COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Sheron Goldin, Copyright 2003. All rights reserved. This material may be used by individuals for personal use only. It can be distributed to and shared with others as long as it remains fully intact, including this copyright notice. It may not be sold, used to produce items for sale, or used on a web page or in a compilation or archive without written permission from the author.